A number of local students attended the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington D.C. on Jan. 20. Forty-one students from Hastings High School went on a six-day trip to Washington D.C. and New York City. A portion of their trip was spent participating in and witnessing Inauguration Day activities.

 Scott Smallidge, social studies teacher at Hastings High School, said that the inauguration portion of the trip was an important piece of the country's history to see in person. The country has been peacefully transferring power every four years since 1789, and Smallidge said that the transfer of power was important for students to see and to participate in. Hayden Schutt, a junior at HHS, said that people from all across the country were at the inauguration and he was able to learn about their political beliefs. He said that he participated in a few conversations with other people about their different political beliefs regardless of whether they were more liberal or more conservative. "Just seeing everyone there, regardless of what they were pro or con, interacting was cool," Schutt said. Lauren Jimenez, a sophomore at HHS, said she learned to appreciate the history and significance of the inaugural ceremony. During the inauguration, she was so overwhelmed with emotions that she said she cried. "Even if you don't like (Trump), just being there, people were so enthusiastic about being there and there was patriotism and you just love your country," Jimenez said. The day after Inauguration Day, the students visited the International Spy Museum, which junior Jacob Zwart said was his favorite part of the trip. "It's the only (public) museum in the U.S. dedicated to espionage, so you become like a spy kind of, and you get to walk around and learn about spy stuff," Zwart said. After visiting the museum, the group was scheduled to attend an excursion at Mount Vernon, but 18 students decided to participate in the Women's March instead. Smallidge said that the Women's March was not originally on the itinerary because they didn't know it was happening until after the election. The students were given a choice to either attend the scheduled Mount Vernon excursion or attend the march. Krista Gomez, a senior at HHS, was one of the students who attended the march. "I liked the positive energy after I had kind of a bad day at the inauguration," said Krista Gomez, a senior. "(Trump is) not my candidate." Gomez said that she respects that Trump has been elected and inaugurated, but she said she liked the Women's March because "it felt good to be surrounded by people who feel the same way I do." [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"3133920","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"The group visited the Statue of Liberty in New York City. (Submitted photo)","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"290"}}]] The next three days were spent in New York City. The students visited Rockefeller Center, where they saw a 360-degree view of the city, took a ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, visited lower Manhattan, saw a Broadway show and visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Zwart said that he had just learned about the industrial revolution in a class at HHS, so it was interesting applying what he learned to what he saw in New York. 4-H also sent students Gillian Haveman, a homeschooled freshman in Hastings, attended Inauguration Day through Citizenship Washington Focus: Presidential Inauguration, a 4-H program. Haveman went with 45 other youth delegates from Minnesota. In Washington, D.C., they joined a total of about 500 4-H youth delegates from across the country. Haveman said she originally applied to go on the trip because she thought it would be neat to be part of a historical event and be able to see it in person. Haveman and the other delegates watched the inauguration on a screen behind the reflecting pool. She said that although they were too far away to see the inauguration up close, it was significant being in Washington and watching the historical event. "I think I enjoyed just being part of the historical moment," Haveman said. In addition to the inauguration, Haveman and the other 4-H delegates visited some of the monuments in Washington, participated in some workshops and listened to speakers including Dan Glickman, Ambassador Barbara Stephenson, Anita McBride, Tim McBride, Ellen Moran and Dr. Adaeze Enekwechi. Haveman said that the experience refreshed her memory on what being a citizen means. Staying up to date on current topics in your community and being an active citizen is important, she said. "You have to be active in your community and voting is such a big part of citizenship and just being informed of what is going on, too, is really important," Haveman said.A number of local students attended the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington D.C. on Jan. 20. Forty-one students from Hastings High School went on a six-day trip to Washington D.C. and New York City. A portion of their trip was spent participating in and witnessing Inauguration Day activities. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"3133919","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"Scott Smallidge is pictured in a selfie with some of the students who attended the inauguration trip. (Submitted photo)","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"320"}}]] Scott Smallidge, social studies teacher at Hastings High School, said that the inauguration portion of the trip was an important piece of the country's history to see in person. The country has been peacefully transferring power every four years since 1789, and Smallidge said that the transfer of power was important for students to see and to participate in. Hayden Schutt, a junior at HHS, said that people from all across the country were at the inauguration and he was able to learn about their political beliefs. He said that he participated in a few conversations with other people about their different political beliefs regardless of whether they were more liberal or more conservative. "Just seeing everyone there, regardless of what they were pro or con, interacting was cool," Schutt said. Lauren Jimenez, a sophomore at HHS, said she learned to appreciate the history and significance of the inaugural ceremony. During the inauguration, she was so overwhelmed with emotions that she said she cried. "Even if you don't like (Trump), just being there, people were so enthusiastic about being there and there was patriotism and you just love your country," Jimenez said. The day after Inauguration Day, the students visited the International Spy Museum, which junior Jacob Zwart said was his favorite part of the trip. "It's the only (public) museum in the U.S. dedicated to espionage, so you become like a spy kind of, and you get to walk around and learn about spy stuff," Zwart said. After visiting the museum, the group was scheduled to attend an excursion at Mount Vernon, but 18 students decided to participate in the Women's March instead. Smallidge said that the Women's March was not originally on the itinerary because they didn't know it was happening until after the election. The students were given a choice to either attend the scheduled Mount Vernon excursion or attend the march. Krista Gomez, a senior at HHS, was one of the students who attended the march. "I liked the positive energy after I had kind of a bad day at the inauguration," said Krista Gomez, a senior. "(Trump is) not my candidate." Gomez said that she respects that Trump has been elected and inaugurated, but she said she liked the Women's March because "it felt good to be surrounded by people who feel the same way I do."

 The next three days were spent in New York City. The students visited Rockefeller Center, where they saw a 360-degree view of the city, took a ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, visited lower Manhattan, saw a Broadway show and visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Zwart said that he had just learned about the industrial revolution in a class at HHS, so it was interesting applying what he learned to what he saw in New York. 4-H also sent students Gillian Haveman, a homeschooled freshman in Hastings, attended Inauguration Day through Citizenship Washington Focus: Presidential Inauguration, a 4-H program. Haveman went with 45 other youth delegates from Minnesota. In Washington, D.C., they joined a total of about 500 4-H youth delegates from across the country. Haveman said she originally applied to go on the trip because she thought it would be neat to be part of a historical event and be able to see it in person. Haveman and the other delegates watched the inauguration on a screen behind the reflecting pool. She said that although they were too far away to see the inauguration up close, it was significant being in Washington and watching the historical event. "I think I enjoyed just being part of the historical moment," Haveman said. In addition to the inauguration, Haveman and the other 4-H delegates visited some of the monuments in Washington, participated in some workshops and listened to speakers including Dan Glickman, Ambassador Barbara Stephenson, Anita McBride, Tim McBride, Ellen Moran and Dr. Adaeze Enekwechi. Haveman said that the experience refreshed her memory on what being a citizen means. Staying up to date on current topics in your community and being an active citizen is important, she said. "You have to be active in your community and voting is such a big part of citizenship and just being informed of what is going on, too, is really important," Haveman said.A number of local students attended the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington D.C. on Jan. 20.Forty-one students from Hastings High School went on a six-day trip to Washington D.C. and New York City. A portion of their trip was spent participating in and witnessing Inauguration Day activities.

 Scott Smallidge, social studies teacher at Hastings High School, said that the inauguration portion of the trip was an important piece of the country's history to see in person. The country has been peacefully transferring power every four years since 1789, and Smallidge said that the transfer of power was important for students to see and to participate in.Hayden Schutt, a junior at HHS, said that people from all across the country were at the inauguration and he was able to learn about their political beliefs. He said that he participated in a few conversations with other people about their different political beliefs regardless of whether they were more liberal or more conservative."Just seeing everyone there, regardless of what they were pro or con, interacting was cool," Schutt said.Lauren Jimenez, a sophomore at HHS, said she learned to appreciate the history and significance of the inaugural ceremony. During the inauguration, she was so overwhelmed with emotions that she said she cried."Even if you don't like (Trump), just being there, people were so enthusiastic about being there and there was patriotism and you just love your country," Jimenez said.The day after Inauguration Day, the students visited the International Spy Museum, which junior Jacob Zwart said was his favorite part of the trip."It's the only (public) museum in the U.S. dedicated to espionage, so you become like a spy kind of, and you get to walk around and learn about spy stuff," Zwart said.After visiting the museum, the group was scheduled to attend an excursion at Mount Vernon, but 18 students decided to participate in the Women's March instead. Smallidge said that the Women's March was not originally on the itinerary because they didn't know it was happening until after the election. The students were given a choice to either attend the scheduled Mount Vernon excursion or attend the march.Krista Gomez, a senior at HHS, was one of the students who attended the march."I liked the positive energy after I had kind of a bad day at the inauguration," said Krista Gomez, a senior. "(Trump is) not my candidate."Gomez said that she respects that Trump has been elected and inaugurated, but she said she liked the Women's March because "it felt good to be surrounded by people who feel the same way I do."[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"3133920","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"The group visited the Statue of Liberty in New York City. (Submitted photo)","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"290"}}]] The next three days were spent in New York City. The students visited Rockefeller Center, where they saw a 360-degree view of the city, took a ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, visited lower Manhattan, saw a Broadway show and visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Zwart said that he had just learned about the industrial revolution in a class at HHS, so it was interesting applying what he learned to what he saw in New York.4-H also sent studentsGillian Haveman, a homeschooled freshman in Hastings, attended Inauguration Day through Citizenship Washington Focus: Presidential Inauguration, a 4-H program. Haveman went with 45 other youth delegates from Minnesota. In Washington, D.C., they joined a total of about 500 4-H youth delegates from across the country.Haveman said she originally applied to go on the trip because she thought it would be neat to be part of a historical event and be able to see it in person. Haveman and the other delegates watched the inauguration on a screen behind the reflecting pool. She said that although they were too far away to see the inauguration up close, it was significant being in Washington and watching the historical event."I think I enjoyed just being part of the historical moment," Haveman said.In addition to the inauguration, Haveman and the other 4-H delegates visited some of the monuments in Washington, participated in some workshops and listened to speakers including Dan Glickman, Ambassador Barbara Stephenson, Anita McBride, Tim McBride, Ellen Moran and Dr. Adaeze Enekwechi.Haveman said that the experience refreshed her memory on what being a citizen means. Staying up to date on current topics in your community and being an active citizen is important, she said."You have to be active in your community and voting is such a big part of citizenship and just being informed of what is going on, too, is really important," Haveman said.A number of local students attended the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington D.C. on Jan. 20.Forty-one students from Hastings High School went on a six-day trip to Washington D.C. and New York City. A portion of their trip was spent participating in and witnessing Inauguration Day activities.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"3133919","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"Scott Smallidge is pictured in a selfie with some of the students who attended the inauguration trip. (Submitted photo)","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"320"}}]] Scott Smallidge, social studies teacher at Hastings High School, said that the inauguration portion of the trip was an important piece of the country's history to see in person. The country has been peacefully transferring power every four years since 1789, and Smallidge said that the transfer of power was important for students to see and to participate in.Hayden Schutt, a junior at HHS, said that people from all across the country were at the inauguration and he was able to learn about their political beliefs. He said that he participated in a few conversations with other people about their different political beliefs regardless of whether they were more liberal or more conservative."Just seeing everyone there, regardless of what they were pro or con, interacting was cool," Schutt said.Lauren Jimenez, a sophomore at HHS, said she learned to appreciate the history and significance of the inaugural ceremony. During the inauguration, she was so overwhelmed with emotions that she said she cried."Even if you don't like (Trump), just being there, people were so enthusiastic about being there and there was patriotism and you just love your country," Jimenez said.The day after Inauguration Day, the students visited the International Spy Museum, which junior Jacob Zwart said was his favorite part of the trip."It's the only (public) museum in the U.S. dedicated to espionage, so you become like a spy kind of, and you get to walk around and learn about spy stuff," Zwart said.After visiting the museum, the group was scheduled to attend an excursion at Mount Vernon, but 18 students decided to participate in the Women's March instead. Smallidge said that the Women's March was not originally on the itinerary because they didn't know it was happening until after the election. The students were given a choice to either attend the scheduled Mount Vernon excursion or attend the march.Krista Gomez, a senior at HHS, was one of the students who attended the march."I liked the positive energy after I had kind of a bad day at the inauguration," said Krista Gomez, a senior. "(Trump is) not my candidate."Gomez said that she respects that Trump has been elected and inaugurated, but she said she liked the Women's March because "it felt good to be surrounded by people who feel the same way I do."

 The next three days were spent in New York City. The students visited Rockefeller Center, where they saw a 360-degree view of the city, took a ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, visited lower Manhattan, saw a Broadway show and visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Zwart said that he had just learned about the industrial revolution in a class at HHS, so it was interesting applying what he learned to what he saw in New York.4-H also sent studentsGillian Haveman, a homeschooled freshman in Hastings, attended Inauguration Day through Citizenship Washington Focus: Presidential Inauguration, a 4-H program. Haveman went with 45 other youth delegates from Minnesota. In Washington, D.C., they joined a total of about 500 4-H youth delegates from across the country.Haveman said she originally applied to go on the trip because she thought it would be neat to be part of a historical event and be able to see it in person. Haveman and the other delegates watched the inauguration on a screen behind the reflecting pool. She said that although they were too far away to see the inauguration up close, it was significant being in Washington and watching the historical event."I think I enjoyed just being part of the historical moment," Haveman said.In addition to the inauguration, Haveman and the other 4-H delegates visited some of the monuments in Washington, participated in some workshops and listened to speakers including Dan Glickman, Ambassador Barbara Stephenson, Anita McBride, Tim McBride, Ellen Moran and Dr. Adaeze Enekwechi.Haveman said that the experience refreshed her memory on what being a citizen means. Staying up to date on current topics in your community and being an active citizen is important, she said."You have to be active in your community and voting is such a big part of citizenship and just being informed of what is going on, too, is really important," Haveman said.

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